Apr 152010
 

If you haven’t happened upon it yet, let me recommend at eighty one. Avril writes very movingly and powerfully about her journey alongside her elderly father as he (as they both) come to terms with his vascular dementia.

At yesterday’s candidates’ training session (MTN) we were discussing the difficulties faced when visiting elderly people in care homes. It can be easy to forget that the disconnected faces and the disruptive outbursts are only a snapshot of the person here and now. It’s easy to forget that they have a history, a family, a life. We may never get to hear their stories and so may be utterly unaware of their past. And yet that is what we need to hold in mind during a visit.

This is where Avril’s writing is both profound and necessary. We become privileged sharers in the story and through that sharing come to see others as having a story which, though we may not share it, we acknowledge it before God by valuing our time spent with them and in our prayers for them.

  2 Responses to “Tough writing”

  1. thank you John –  very helpful after yesterday’s discussions

  2. Thanks for the link, John.  I agree, this needs to be written about. I have worked in the elderly care sector, so have some experience. I also have a friend who is suffering from vascular dementia and is forgetting who he is. So sad to see in such an intellegent, kind man.
    We all must focus on the individuals – not the disease. I know it’s easier said than done. I believe the church can be a great support for all who suffer. Did the conference mention Crossreach’s work? Only a drop in the ocean, but showing God’s love in action. Contact them, if you want to talk to staff for guidance/help. (I realise I may be telling you what you already know!).

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